The world’s premier network for those seeking to share and discuss high-impact,high results, super practical information for the developmentof superiorphysical performance.
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    kdadaji is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Posts
    1

    Default How Many Swings for Strength?

    It's pretty standard in the strength and conditioning world to think of "strength training" as 1-5 reps, "hypertrophy" as 8-12 reps, and "muscular endurance" as 15+ reps.
    But a repeatable ballistic like a KB swing has a very different time under tension mechanic than a typical free weight.
    For me, personally, once I get beyond 5 sets of 10 KB swings at a given weight, it feels like volume / conditioning and I'm usually capable of starting to work on the next bell size up.....
    What's the recommended set / rep range for strength building using a KB swing?

  2. #2
    ad5ly is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    4,579

    Default

    The Kettlebell Swing is a ballistic lift. Its purpose is to train the body for conditioning and fat loss. When done correctly Swings improve back health, grip strength, and over all body strength. Although swings performed with very heavy weight will get you stronger - you reach the point of diminishing returns even with heavy weight. Bud Jeffries wrote a book "I will be Iron". I do not have it, but its sort of what you may be looking for. But then I could be wrong. The best way to get strong would be to do kettlebell grinds - TGUs, heavy presses in addition to heavy kettlebell swings (24kg and heavier). ...Dennis

  3. #3
    ad5ly is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    4,579

    Default

    Super heavy kettlebells must be very expensive. I think the heaviest kettlebell is 200lbs from Adler. Beyond that you would have to swing weight plates with a T-bar. My guess is that you could get stronger if you switched to heavy kettlebell snatches - if ballistic lifts is what you prefer. No expert on this but its just me pulling another one out of my butt...Dennis

  4. #4
    Chris Hansen is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    2,141

    Default

    Ballistics are a little different than slow movements but, as I understand, sets of around 10 is about right. Plus or minus a bit. There isn't really a hard cutoff, it's more of a continuum. As long as you're able to work up to heavier weights at a given rep range you're getting stronger.

    As a reference, one program works with 10 sets of 10 reps with maximum explosiveness and plenty of rest between sets. That's not strictly a strength program but it's described as a good prescription for general strength/explosiveness/conditioning

  5. #5
    TOGGS is offline Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    47

    Default

    This will be a very unpopular opinion on this forum, but swings are not a good strength exercise. Further to that point, very few kettlebell movements are, except in untrained populations. If strength is the trait you are looking to train, you would be far better off investing time in a linear progression based program based around barbell movements. Something along the lines of stronglifts or starting strength would be a great place to start.

  6. #6
    ad5ly is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    4,579

    Default

    I actually agree with you. However, kettlebell swings are a good endurance strength drill. There is almost always a tradeoff. Average persons starting off with kbs will increase their strength. Provided they avoid any serious injuries due to bad technique or impatience etc..you can expect to gain considerable strength above and beyond the average population. Kbs also work well for those who live in small living spaces with no room for a home gym. Now barbells will give you greater strength (max strength) more effectively then kbs. Also, barbells are easier to learn and less technical than kbs. I very rarely injure myself with barbells. I can't even remember if I had injured myself with barbells. BUT I have injured myself with kettlebells MANY times. Not the fault of the kettlebell - my own stupidity did me in. So you opinion is not so unpopular imho. Its all about trade-offs...Dennis

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Free Course
Close