The world’s premier network for those seeking to share and discuss high-impact,high results, super practical information for the developmentof superiorphysical performance.
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. #1
    Philip Davis, RKC is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    573

    Default My review of Anabolic Diet

    Disclaimer: I was only on it for 6 weeks. You be the judge of whether that's long enough for me to have an opinion.


    Does it work? Yes, I lost fat.

    Do I like it? No……here's why.


    I didn't like how much by body changed from week to week. During the carb loading phase, I would swell up like a balloon, lose whatever definition I had attained during the week, and have to start from square one on Monday. If I limited my carb loading to 24 hours I would gain around 6 pounds. If I extended it to 36 (I never went to 48) then I'd gain about 8 pounds.

    Yes, by Friday evening I was back to my normal weight (or lower), and the gut I grew over the weekend had disappeared, but it took ALL week to get there. For the first 2-3 days after my carb loading it seemed like all I was doing was paying for my sins of the weekend and this happened week after week.

    I probably lost 3-5 lbs of fat and probably 1.5" around the waist. Those are pretty good results by any standard. I wasn't a tub of lard to start with but probably about 10 pounds heavier than I should be. It was fun and I'm glad I did it but the AD is not for me because of the drastic mood, energy, and body fluctuations. Pros and cons below:


    Pros

    1. You will lose fat.
    2. You can eat the things you've been depriving yourself of for years.
    3. You can still have the foods you love.........just not until the weekend.
    4. It's fun.
    5. Very simple to follow compared to other diets (Zone, Burn the Fat, etc.)


    Cons

    1. Tired, weak and lazy during carb loading phase. Workouts were a joke.
    2. Tendency to binge during carb loading. I probably averaged 5,000-6,000 calories a
    day when it was time to carb up. A little excessive but that may be through my
    own charcter flaw of lack of control instead of a problem with the diet.
    3. Felt good Mon through Wed but energy and job performance suffered all day
    Thursday and Friday (after carbs are totally depleted) No carbs equals no
    energy and I'm a very active person. I don't care what the book says about how your
    body will learn to turn the fat into energy. I'm not convinced about that whole sugar
    burner versus fat burner thing. I have lost 5 pounds of fat in 6 weeks before I tried
    the AD and I consumed low to moderate carbs every day (although very little junk food).
    4. I'm not a scientist, nutritionist or an expert in the field so take what I'm about to
    say with a grain of salt. I don't think all that fat (especially saturated fat) can be
    good for you.
    5. Although I didn't take measurements (I know, I should have and I admit I'm an idiot)
    I'm pretty sure I lost muscle. I'm not obsessed with myself but I do keep track in a
    general sense of how I look and I swear I lost some muscle.

    Lessons Learned:

    1. Carbs are important.

    2. You should cycle your carbs.

    3. Most people should eat more fat, less junk food, and more complex carbs (yams, oatmeal,etc.)

    4. Having some low to moderate carb days with an occasional spike in your carb consumption (maybe every 2-4 days) is a good thing.

    5. What works for you probably won't work for me and vice versa.


    This seems like an extreme way of eating, which is probably what attracted me to it in the first place. I like rubbing against the grain and doing things because everybody says I can’t do it. However, although it was fun and I lost some fat, I just didn’t like the way this diet made me feel……too many ups and downs. When a diet affects my workouts then it’s interfering with my goals and that’s not a good thing. To each his own. If you like the AD, or you are thinking about trying it, just ignore this post. Everybody finds their happy place in their own way, the AD just isn’t my way.


    Thanks for reading,

    Philip

  2. #2
    Semonides is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    1,724
    Blog Entries
    117

    Default

    thanks for being a guinea pig. I too found AD not to be for me. There were not enough rules. I would completely negate the results of the low-carb times with the carb-loading times. And I had a problem with the meat. Not the cholesterol or the fat, but the hormones, chemicals, and other crap. I cannot afford grass-fed, drug-free beef. So I felt I was always playing Russian Roulette by eating pounds of store-bought meat every day.

  3. #3
    M.Harris is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    San Rafael, CA
    Posts
    240

    Default

    You know the strangest thing for me on the AD was f**ked up dreams. I would have terrifying dreams during my no carb phase. I think my brain was having some very large upsets due to the lack of carbohydrates. I do really well of eating more Warrior Diet style, and cycling two days of high fat, low carbohydrate, and one day of high carbohydrate, low fat. This seems more natural to me, especially looking at the human as a hunter/gatherer. Some days I would get a kill in the morning and live of meat for a few days. Then when the meat ran out, go looking for some fruits and vegetables unless I came across another deer or something in the forest. I felt like it was too damn much meat also. I don't agree with the warning about polyunsaturated fats either, or not utilizing MCT's for energy. If I eat a teaspoon of coconut oil before a workout with some whey I feel amazing and blast through my workout, then hit up some carbs after my workout. Bam, anabolic city. I leaned down a TON in about 2 weeks, the weekend carb up does not work for me either. I just feel like crap, even if I eat clean. So all and all I feel similarly about this diet. I think it teaches us a good way to look at food fuels, it just needs to be adjusted to fit each person. And for some that equals completely changing it.

  4. #4
    Franz Snideman is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    888
    Blog Entries
    6

    Default

    Phillip,

    thanks for sharing. Your review of the AD was very clean and detailed. I enjoyed reading it. At the end of the day I always have told people that they need to tweak their diets to fit their individual needs, goals and reactions. Ultimately, if you are eating well you should:

    1) Feel Great with lots of energy
    2) Be lean
    3) Have a sex drive
    4) Feel strong
    5) Sleep well
    6) Be clear and level headed

    If any of these things are off......you're not eating well for you! Once again, great synopsis!

    Best,

    Franz

  5. #5
    gachumway is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Marquette, Michigan
    Posts
    134
    Blog Entries
    89

    Default

    I have read just the basics of what the anabolic diet is, and worked it into my way of eating.

    My weekly diet mirrors that of the warrior diet with little eaten but enough vegetables, nuts, and dairy products to keep me going through the day. When I finish attending night class or complete a workout, I eat a considerable amount of high fat / high protein grass fed beef, whole milk dairy products, and eggs. I make sure to get some sugar from milk, yogurt, or kefir following a workout.

    On the weekends I consume a diet low in cholesterol and fat but high in complex carbohydrates. Since the high carbohydrate foods cause my blood glucose levels to rise and fall throughout the day, I eat roughly every 2 hours. The foods I typically eat are bean burritos, rice, sushi, and pasta. I decrease my dairy consumption and switch to low-fat dairy.

    I'm spending more on food now, as I was pretty much lacto-ova vegetarian the past 6-months, but my energy levels are considerably higher and I feel great.

    Here's my favorite recipe for the week

    3-Vegetable Pot Roast
    1) Start with enough olive oil to thickly cover the bottom of the crock pot
    2) 3 lb beef roast
    3) Salt
    4) 1 beer (use a porter or a stout)
    5) Radishes
    6) Carrots
    7) Celery

    The radishes are key. They almost turn out like a boiled a potato. Compared to the potato though they are much lower in carbohydrates while still providing a good source of Vitamin C and Potassium.

    This sits in the slow cooker for about 8 hours while I'm at class. I try to eat something else at dinner it this so I can save some of it for the next night's dinner.

    Here's the nutrition data on it: Nutrition Facts and Analysis for 3-Vegetable Pot Roast
    Last edited by gachumway; 01-28-2009 at 07:00 PM.

  6. #6
    gachumway is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Marquette, Michigan
    Posts
    134
    Blog Entries
    89

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Semonides View Post
    And I had a problem with the meat. Not the cholesterol or the fat, but the hormones, chemicals, and other crap. I cannot afford grass-fed, drug-free beef. So I felt I was always playing Russian Roulette by eating pounds of store-bought meat every day.
    I will agree with you on that one. I think I am going to follow my anabolic influenced diet until I do the RKC in April, and then switch to a more affordable rice and pasta based diet.

  7. #7
    gachumway is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Marquette, Michigan
    Posts
    134
    Blog Entries
    89

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Philip Davis, RKC View Post

    Cons

    1. Tired, weak and lazy during carb loading phase. Workouts were a joke.
    I definitely agree with that assessment. When I first started doing this I had to extend an extra off day on the weekends and take two days off because either a Saturday or Sunday workout was usually shit. Laziness coinciding on the weekend works for me now that I've arranged my workout schedule to fit it though.

  8. #8
    ZachariahSalazarRKC is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Phoenix AZ-San Diego CA-Hawaii Kai HI
    Posts
    3,389

    Default

    It doesnt sound like you actually followed the diet. Your supposed to stick to certain calorie and macro nutrient numbers. Your supposed to adjust to your goal once you get your responses. 4 weeks is a start. From there you can say I need to fix this or that. Long term this is supposed to get you lean AND allow you to get a full glycogen load to fuel harder or mass building workouts.
    You have cutting and mass building phases once you figure out how your body responds and then continue to fine tune.

    Next time you are ready to try it look me up zzzzzzzzzzzzzz

  9. #9
    HUNTER1313 is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    389

    Default

    Hey Z, whats your opinion of the AD? You must be for it. I am thinking about giving it a try, any tips, suggestions, or any info would be greatly appreciated.

  10. #10
    Philip Davis, RKC is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    573

    Default Thanks

    for the replies everyone. Good thoughts.



    Z,

    Maybe I needed to give it some more time and adjust some more according to my body's reactions. 6 weeks doesn't make me an expert by any means, I just wasn't too impressed from my initial experience even though I did lose some fat. When I'm ready to give it another go, and have learned the fine art of patience, I'll give you a shout.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Free Course
Close