The world’s premier network for those seeking to share and discuss high-impact,high results, super practical information for the developmentof superiorphysical performance.
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    stoney431 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    86

    Default Need help maintaining weight

    My natural weight is somewhere between 170 and 175 lbs, but I am a rower and whenever I get into a season, my weight drops down to 165, sometimes even 162-3. I eat 5-6 meals per day, and it seems that no matter what I do I can't gain or maintain my weight. Does anyone have any suggestions of what I can do to gain a few pounds or at least keep my weight while doing intense physical activity?

  2. #2
    Bram Wiley is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    La Jolla, CA.
    Posts
    359
    Blog Entries
    728

    Default

    I think you should write down what you eat and put it up here, but some basic stuff you can do is just beef up the calories you have at each meal.

    A couple examples:

    you could have a sandwich, or a sandwich with half an avocado (extra 130 calories) and a piece of fruit (another 50-100 calories)
    you could have a salad with veggies and fat-free dressing, or a salad with an ounce of cheese and a tablespoon of olive oil (extra 230 calories)

    and so on.

  3. #3
    Steve Freides is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    7,649

    Default

    Why fight the weight change?

    -S-
    http://www.kbnj.com

  4. #4
    stoney431 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    86

    Default

    Steve,
    Fair question.
    My reasons for fighting the weight change are:
    1. I feel like my losing weight when I've always been active may mean I'm not adequately nourishing my body.
    2. I feel skinny as it is and don't like the idea of being even skinnier.

    Bram,
    I will definitely take your advice on upping the calories and adding good sources of fat like avocados.

  5. #5
    Steve Freides is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    7,649

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by stoney431 View Post
    Steve,
    Fair question.
    My reasons for fighting the weight change are:
    1. I feel like my losing weight when I've always been active may mean I'm not adequately nourishing my body.
    2. I feel skinny as it is and don't like the idea of being even skinnier.
    1) Well, maybe, maybe not. You can get crazy standing on a scale - instead, go by how you feel athletically. It is perfectly natural, when engaging in a high volume of aerobic activity, to lose weight - it's why people do it. Remember the studies in the RKC book and elsewhere that demonstrate the point: our bodies adapt to our training. The fact that your brain thinks you should weigh more doesn't mean that your body agrees.

    2) Lift more, row less - or accept that you're in fine shape for your chosen sport and let your coaches tell you if they think you need to be doing more to keep your weight up.

    Mind you, I'm playing devil's advocate here a little, but only a little. There have been, for years, endurance athletes who lift during their off-season, put on a little weight, and then lose it once their season begins. There is nothing inherently wrong with this process in my opinion. Even my own, relatively sedentary lifestyle sees this happening because I tend to walk much more when the weather is nicer and I end up weighing a little less as a result.

    Just my opinion here - bottom line: just be sure you're not playing a head game with yourself regarding the numbers you see on the scale.

    -S-
    http://www.kbnj.com

  6. #6
    stoney431 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    86

    Default

    Thanks Steve. I do tend to obsess over the number on the scale and you make a good point. I'll go off of how I feel athletically.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Free Course
Close