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  1. #1
    HUNTER1313 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Whole milk vs Homo milk

    What is the difference? Any benefits of one over the other? Is whole milk worth the extra money?

  2. #2
    DLS
    DLS is offline Senior Member
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    I think you are confusing the homogenization process with a type of milk. Homogenization can be done with whole milk, or any of the lower fat content milk products until you get down to skim (or no fat). Once you reduce the fat content to the level of skim milk the need for homogenization is removed (at least in one sense ... see below).

    Homogenization in a process of intense mixing ... to combine what would normally be insoluble components of a suspension into a solution. It is used in many industrial applications, not just in milk production. A suspension separates out over time. In milk you would see the solids dropping to the bottom of the jug, the fats rising to the top and the water content somewhere in the middle. Prior to the homogenization process one would have to vigorously shake milk each time before use. Think of your typical oil and vinegar salad dressing. Notice how it separates and needs vigorous mixing prior to use? This is a suspension. The problem with milk is that the components do not go into suspension very easy. It takes many minutes of shaking, more than the normal consumer wishes to do. Another problem with milk is that is separates out so quickly that transportation and storage become a problem.

    A solution does not separate out. So in homogenization, the fat globules are broken down into small enough conglomerations were they stay in suspension ... at least for as long as the shelf life of the milk anyway.

    Another use of homogenization in the diary world is to combine the milk from different herds to create a more uniform raw milk, so the resultant processed milk is more consistent.

    Whole milk is more expensive because it has a higher market demand. Skim milk actually costs more to produce (the fat extraction process adds cost) but has lower demand, hence lower market price. While the marginal profit for a gallon of skim milk is lower than that for whole, there is still a gigantic market for this product, so dairy producers offer the product as it still results in many dollars in total cash flow.

    Is whole milk worth the extra money? That depends on your diet / health goals. There are many beneficial elements to milk fat ... but whole milk is very high in calories so many folks opt for the lower / no fat versions and account for the lost nutrients with less calorie dense foods. For others, the taste of the low/no fat versions is not palatable so they opt for whole.

    The reverse is also true. When I drink whole milk I feel like someone has painted the inside of my mouth with grease ... I do not like the fatty mouth feel. So I drink skim as I like the taste more, not to mention I'm always looking to save a few pence along the way!

    I hope this helps.
    Last edited by DLS; 03-20-2012 at 10:03 AM.
    Be well ... Lee.

  3. #3
    DLS
    DLS is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Acle View Post
    Hello guys,..
    Homo milk is the pure milk and whole milk is not pure milk.But milk is the best for good health
    and fitness.So we should be drinking homo milk.

    Ummm .... no. Homogenization is a process done to milk, any type of milk (or other colloidal solution of which milk is). Homo milk is milk that has been through the homogenization process, nothing more.

    What about whole milk makes it "not pure milk"?
    Be well ... Lee.

  4. #4
    DLS
    DLS is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by elixir View Post
    And just to take this one stage further, have you considered pasteurisation?

    There is a growing trend towards RAW milk, which hasn't been pasteurised, and still contains the beneficial bacteria that it should naturally have - this is the waqy we always used to drink milk, and the way they still do in much of Europe.

    The result seems to be that the milk is much more digestable.

    You can't get it from supermarkets or shops in the UK, but have to buy direct from the farm.
    Hi Elixir,

    I was wondering when pasteurization was going to pop up! You can't purchase raw milk from markets in the US as well. Most US states ban the "transfer" of raw milk to other individuals, so only actual owners of the cows can legally consume it.

    This has created all sorts of "interesting" coop ownership arrangements. A recent local dairy whose raw milk caused an e-coli outbreak that killed a young boy had 25 "owners" for each cow! Amazing what some will do to skirt a law.

    There is a reason for the heavy regulation of raw milk. While pasteurization does kill beneficial bacteria ... it also kills many extremely dangerous pathogens. It may be the way we used to drink milk but most have come to enjoy the drastic reduction of disease that pasteurization has allowed.
    Be well ... Lee.

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Default

    My parents milked a few cows; as a kid, I grew up on whole milk, fresh from the separator in the milkbarn. Not until I went to public school, did I know, what pasturized milk was. I wouldnt drink whole milk now...way too much fats! I cant drink whole homogenized milk, it tastes almost like half and half. I settled for 2%, sometimes 1%. 2% tastes the best in cereal I find.

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