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  1. #1
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    Default Professional Personal Trainers: High fat diets for your clients?

    I am going to be a personal trainer and I am studying for my certification right now. I have also really gotten into the idea of a high-fat/protien, low carb diet. This type of diet has worked wonders for me.

    I know that personal trainers need to stay within the boundaries of their own profession but I was wondering if anyone here had any reservations about recommending a high fat diet? I know that I eat that way myself so I don't think it would be out of line to advise a person to look into the subject themselves. However, I am afraid that someone could suffer from health issues if I am wrong and high fat diets really are dangerous.

  2. #2
    Spikeman1444 is offline Senior Member
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    What's your most recommended meal frequency? 6 times a day? 3 times a day? I'm no professional by the way, I'm just curious..
    Last edited by Spikeman1444; 06-13-2012 at 07:40 AM.

  3. #3
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    I always recommend it. But you have to make certain that your clients understand that they need to fully commit to it. They can't half-ass it, do partially high fat and partially high carb. Otherwise, yes, they'll wind up with the typical modern society health epidemics we see today. If you need scientific proof of a high fat/low carb/moderate protein diet, you can certainly find it. Find confidence in this lifestyle and your clients might very well agree to change theirs.
    [I]Live and lift with power and grace[/I]

    [URL]http://www.Beautiful-Strength.com[/URL]

  4. #4
    hopperja is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by christinemooney View Post
    I always recommend it. But you have to make certain that your clients understand that they need to fully commit to it. They can't half-ass it, do partially high fat and partially high carb. Otherwise, yes, they'll wind up with the typical modern society health epidemics we see today. If you need scientific proof of a high fat/low carb/moderate protein diet, you can certainly find it. Find confidence in this lifestyle and your clients might very well agree to change theirs.
    This brings to mind the Beddoes-Harvey-Pennington theory of defective carboyhydrate metabolism. To my knowledge, while this theory has been around ~100 years, it has never been adequately researched. Meanwhile, the high-carb/low fat theory has been around ~150 years, been incessantly researched, and has never been proven. Perhaps it's time to consider a different theory...

    Very much agreed, except that the scientific evidence is as muddy as water can get. Unfortunately, it's been presented for the past 40+ years as being settled, but it's not. Regarding nutrition research, only two things are proven:
    1- for some, any diet works. Meaning, they can eat anything and still maintain optimal weight.
    2- for others, a low carb/high fat/high-moderate protein diet works. For this group, insulin drives fat storage and fat metabolism. Carbs primarily are responsible for causing insulin release. Proteins also cause insulin release, to a much, much smaller degree. Eat a high fat/moderate protein/low carb diet and lose weight. This is also called the Banting diet.

    It seems everyone falls in #1 or some degree of #2.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by hopperja View Post
    1- for some, any diet works. Meaning, they can eat anything and still maintain optimal weight.
    Yes, scientific research is muddy, but as is sad but true in the world of research, you can frequently find scientific research to support any principle you want. That said, there has been some interesting nutritional research, but whether or not that has been wildly distributed is another story.

    Besides, what people need to ask themselves is whether or not weight is the only factor being considered in which diet to maintain? I would so "no", hands-down. (But many people don't seem to understand that what you consume does more than affect your appearance).

    A calorie certainly is not just a calorie. Back in the 1960s when obesity rates were beginning to be tracked, only around 15% of U.S. adults were obese, compared to the roughly 1/3 who are now, this was already an issue:

    Interesting tidbit: "In 1950 an American doctor, John Gofman, put forward a hypothesis that blood cholesterol was to blame for the rise in coronary heart disease. This was supported in 1951 when pathologists were sent to Korea to learn about war wounds by dissecting the bodies of dead soldiers. To their surprise they discovered unexpected evidence of coronary heart disease: unexpected for they knew that death from heart disease was extremely rare under middle age and these men averaged only twenty-two years of age. So the pathologists performed detailed dissections on the hearts of the next 300 corpses. In thirty-five percent they found deposits of fibrous, fatty material sticking to the artery walls. A further forty-one percent had fully formed lesions, and in three percent of the soldiers these lesions were sufficiently large that they blocked at least one coronary artery. Thus, over three-quarters of all the men examined showed evidence of serious coronary heart disease – and they were barely out of their teens."

    Those soldiers would have grown up with the government's "Basic 7" food pyramid, which advocated a high-carb/high-fat diet.

    Further research here.

    Anyways, I'm probably calling the kettle black with all this sort of information in this community and on this forum, but it's still very interesting stuff. And who doesn't like to reference scientific research when explaining why they eat the way they do?

    A fun line from a WWII-era nutrition manifesto: "the most agile, the most energetic nation will come out on top…spaghetti is not for fighters."
    [I]Live and lift with power and grace[/I]

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  6. #6
    csabour is offline Junior Member
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    You can never know for certain the interaction between the client's genes and the foods that YOU recommend. Even if you say "eat spinach every day" you do not know if your client has a selenium deficiency and your spinach recommendation would deplete selenium even MORE. In this case you are liable for the symptoms

    I got my PTS certification from Can Fit Pro a few months ago, and yes I had to come to the conclusion that as a personal trainer it is not appropriate to recommend ANY nutritional tips besides the government issued food pyramid. In my opinion the food pyramid is laughable, especially for fat loss.

    The best work around is to recommend or even give the client a good resource for them to draw their own conclusion. I give every client a copy of the 4 Hour Body during our consultation.
    Last edited by csabour; 06-25-2012 at 08:40 PM.

  7. #7
    BillLumbergRKC is offline Senior Member
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    i second this response

  8. #8
    forth is offline Senior Member
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    I usually recommend trying different things. If one doesn't work.. for whatever reason.. there's a multitude of other variations of eating to try out.

    In light of recent studies I'd be careful to recommend low carb - high protein though.

    Also do bear in mind that quite a bit of the stuff out on low carb - high fat style diets is very much sponsored by some meat industry or other.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by csabour View Post
    You can never know for certain the interaction between the client's genes and the foods that YOU recommend. Even if you say "eat spinach every day" you do not know if your client has a selenium deficiency and your spinach recommendation would deplete selenium even MORE. In this case you are liable for the symptoms

    I got my PTS certification from Can Fit Pro a few months ago, and yes I had to come to the conclusion that as a personal trainer it is not appropriate to recommend ANY nutritional tips besides the government issued food pyramid. In my opinion the food pyramid is laughable, especially for fat loss.

    The best work around is to recommend or even give the client a good resource for them to draw their own conclusion. I give every client a copy of the 4 Hour Body during our consultation.
    Isn't it the plate now : ). The food pyramid is old!! haha

    Good answer. Recommend good sources.
    Last edited by 12 12 Fireball; 06-27-2012 at 06:30 PM.

  10. #10
    BillLumbergRKC is offline Senior Member
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    that study is garbage, but I don't have enough keystrokes in me to explain why. However, I still agree with Forth. If your client is not losing weight and getting stronger, you must try a different approach. (this is very possible with the untrained masses. Those that have been in the iron game a bit should be maintaining strength while losing weight) Also, I'm making the assumption that the aforementioned client falls into the 99% of people who buy personal training--they may say it in different ways like "tone up" or "firm up the stomach", but they are after body comp improvement.

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