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  1. #1
    PRS
    PRS is offline Senior Member
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    Default "Eating Well for Optimum Health" by Andrew Weil (review)

    Weil is an M.D. and a professor of medicine at the University of Arizona where he also runs a program on Integrative Medicine, combining holistic with Western medicine. He has a large medical practice himself and is considered by many to be the guru of the holistic health movement. I expected his book to come with a lot of anti-Western medicine prejudice and "progressive" views on A-Z, but I found little of this. It is basically a medical-based book written for the average educated reader.

    The bulk of the book is a scientific/medical description of the macronutrients -- carbohydrates, fat and protein -- and the micronutrients -- vitamins, phytonutrients, minerals, fiber. The descriptions are written in clear English and address all the major issues. They are an excellent introduction to the topics with enough medicine and science to educate, but not so much as to blow smoke. There's a bit of fear-mongering (fears without any scientific support and any sense of relative risk), but it's not overwhelming.

    Weil's optimum diet is 50-60% carbohydrates comprising fruits, vegetables (cooked and uncooked because of differences in nutritional bioavailaibility) and whole grains; 30% fats (primarily mono and poly, with attention to omega 3 and 6); and 10-20% protein (including vegetable proteins). For losing weight, no gimmicks. Just eat healthy, same proportions of macronutrients, but consume fewer calories and burn more through exercise.

    He has a short section reviewing popular diets -- low carb, paleo, raw food, Japanese, Mediterranean. His discussion is limited to bullet points, but he does capture well the conventional understanding of the pros and cons of these diets. He likes the Mediterranean diet best.

    I expected him to recommend vitamins and supplements galore, but he did not, and the few he recommended were in similar dosages (for the most part) as my daily Centrum. He advises C, 100 mg. twice a day; E, 400-800 IU natural (the book is a few years old and I don't know if he currently advises the same given recent vitamin E studies); selenium, 200 mcg; mixed carotenoids 25,000 IU; B complex vitamin w/400mcg of folic acid; and calcium, 12-1500 mg. as calcium carbonate. His book explains why he recommends these.

    He also has an appendix for dietary recommendations for health and disease issues, but this is simply a listing of recommended foods with no direct discussion of why the recommendations. The book's text does cover some of the issues, but only as part of a larger discussion of the macro or micronutrient at issue.

  2. #2
    Symmon is offline Member
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    Default Dr Weil and his eat well look!!!!

    Comrades

    Has any one seen a picture of Dr Weil?

    If you call that physique healthy then the new Food Pramid will do fine.


    Symmon

  3. #3
    belaglazov is offline Senior Member
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    Default Dr Weil and his eat well look!!!!

    Andrew weil is a fat ass with a pot belly

  4. #4
    Billybuck is offline Member
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    Default Current vitamin E studies?

    What are the new studies saying in regard to dosages etc.

  5. #5
    PRS
    PRS is offline Senior Member
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    Default Summary

    "A report published in the March 16, 2005 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association finds no clear evidence that men and women who had vascular disease or diabetes and who took 400 i.u. of vitamin E daily for 7 years reduced their risk of cancer compared to others with these conditions who took a placebo 1. The study was not large enough to determine if vitamin E could prevent specific cancers. The report also showed that those taking vitamin E had a 13 percent increased risk of heart failure, a condition in which the heart's ability to pump blood is weakened. The report comes from a clinical trial called the Heart Outcomes Prevention Evaluation Study Extension (HOPE-TOO). These results emphasize the need to study vitamins and other natural products prior to making public health recommendations"

    My understanding is that most national orgs who recommend vitamin E or are field testing are continuing with the recommendations and trials, though they are studying this data.

  6. #6
    mimosa is offline Junior Member
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    Default Dr Weil and his eat well look!!!!

    he has some good information but he's surely out of shape and definitely far from the cutting edge in the nutrition field. i find him fairly mainstream.

    Suzy

  7. #7
    Komardovich is offline Senior Member
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    Default Vitamin E

    It is postulated that taking the d fraction of vitamin E in isolation can cause a deficiency of the gamma fraction. This supports warnings of whole-foods advocates, but may simply mean that you need to take a full spectrum vitamin E supplement that contains gamma as well as other forms.

    And eat you fruits, veggies, and whole grains!

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