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  1. #11
    Rikard is offline Senior Member
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    Default difference?

    ok, think i've got starches down. bur what is the difference between starches and carbohydrates? isn't both used for energy? which one is best/most suitable for humans?

    thanks
    //rikard

  2. #12
    dkaler is offline Senior Member
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    Default difference?

    Basically, starch is a subclassification of a classification of carbohydrates:

    Carbohydrates can be classified as:

    Monosaccharides - which can't be broken down into a simpler form of carbohydrate (e.g. glucose and fructose).

    Disaccharides - which are formed from two monosaccharides (e.g. maltose has 2 units of glucose, and sucrose has a glucose and a fructose unit).

    Polysaccharides - which contain several hundred to several thousand monosaccharide units (e.g. cellulose and starch).

  3. #13
    kbpaul is offline Senior Member
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    Default Thank you for the advice! .....n/m

    zzzzzzzzzzzzzz

  4. #14
    kbpaul is offline Senior Member
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    Default Thanks......n/m

    zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz

  5. #15
    amg455 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Ever cut sugar completely out of your diet?

    So, you did a vegetarian diet and so did your friend? And he had no energy from it? Seems about right...

  6. #16
    Rikard is offline Senior Member
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    Default so on a low-carb diet..

    where you basically get your carbs from veggies and fruit you would get Polysaccharides and Monosaccharides?
    Anyone of those three you should try to get as much/low as possible of?

    i think i've read that fructose goes directly to the liver and creates a spike which other carbs don't do, right or wrong?

    thanks for your help
    //Rikard

  7. #17
    dkaler is offline Senior Member
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    Default As I understand it

    Fruits and veggies provide starch, which is a polysaccharide. The polysaccharides (or other carbohydrates for that matter) are broken down by enzymes (digestive enzymes are present in the salivary glands, the stomach,the pancreas and the small intestine) into their constituent glucose molecules, which the body uses as "fuel". The final step occurs in the small intestine - the glucose is basically absorbed by the intestinal epithelium. From there it goes into the interstitial fluid, then to the capillaries, and finally it's transported to the liver via the hepatic portal vein. The liver basically acts to stabilize blood glucose levels. If glucose levels decline, glycogen reserves are broken down by the liver to form glucose, which is released into the bloodstream. If blood glucose levels rise, the liver removes glucose from circulation and stores it as glycogen or uses it to synthesize lipids (fat). Glucose basically provides energy. Thanks - I needed that little review of digestive physiology myself

  8. #18
    Rikard is offline Senior Member
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    Default just a little bit more....

    Thanks for your info so far.

    If I now eat 70% carbs and 30% fat (hypothetical) all that carb is used for energy and if I don't need energy it will convert to fat and save it along with the fat from the meal(as I understand it).

    But if I turn the numbers around(30% carbs and 70% fat), that means I don't have that available energy (except for that 30%)in my stomach so my body begins to break down fat into energy?

    Is there such a thing as carb-malnutrion (ie can you get ill if the body doesn't get carbs), can you go too far in letting you body eat fat?

    Which is easiest to make energy out of(carbs or fat)?

    thanks
    //rikard

  9. #19
    Blarg is offline Senior Member
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    Default Ever cut sugar completely out of your diet?

    He did the Fit for Life diet. He wouldn't eat most anything, and was much more radical than most vegetarians by far. He would eat all kinds of foods separately so they wouldn't produced supposed horrible effects by being in the stomach at the same time. This made his meals very unbalanced and more than a little dull and simple. He would say things like, "you can get all the protein you'll need all day be eating an apple!" Oh, he lost plenty of weight all right. But he looked like death, and it was actually kind of scary to look in his eyes sometimes, because he would be going along fine for a bit and then just seem to crash out really hard, just getting slack and unfocussed and devoid of energy, sometimes looking absolutely panicked. His friends and family had several sort-of "interventions" to try to get some sense into him.

    I've had various variations on vegetarianism and near-vegetarianism. At the time I was mentioning in the post above, I would eat meat very occasionally, usually either tuna or skinless chicken, and ate red meat rarely. I wasn't fanatical about it; I just found myself doing fine without it.

    Mostly I just cut way back on starchy foods like pasta, bread, rice, and potatoes. I got protein from eating a very wide variety of veggies and beans and tofu. And I ate as much as I wanted, whenever I wanted. It's almost impossible to gain weight eating a very high proportion of fruits and vegetables; it's the sauces and oils and fats and starches that get you. Not to mention deserts and casual snacking or thoughtless mechanical eating even when you're not hungry, which is a pretty common vice I never got into.

    I often used butter or margarine in sauces, but considering how low calorie everything else I ate was, it didn't add up to much at all. And when I ate salads, I would use rice vinegar or lemon juice or vinegar and (just a bit of) oil dressings. I got into different herbs a lot, to spice things up, and the food was actually pretty flavorful. Garlic, onion, thyme, rosemary, peppers, parsley, fennel, basil, whatever.

    I took care to get enough protein, and felt truly great. One really nice thing about eating like that is that you can eat like a total pig, not deprive yourself or feel hungry. Losing weight while eating as much as you like is a pretty neat trick, but much more possible than most people think. Even a little bit of eating crap like fast food or a lot of starch or fats can screw you over really quickly, but cut back on the garbage and cut back on the starches and there's not really anywhere for the fat to come from. You can eat an enormous amount of vegetables without putting on any weight.

  10. #20
    dkaler is offline Senior Member
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    Default Well

    I wish I could answer those questions. As far as your body using fat for energy, yes it can and it will. Matter of fact, lipids (fats) are important energy reserves, and on the average they'll provide twice as much energy as carbs, gram for gram, when they're broken down by the body (note that fat has 9 kcals per gram, carbs have 4). As far as the optimum amount of carbs vs. fat etc., it's a tough call, imo. I do pretty much a 25% fat, 40% protein, 35% carb diet (on average). Alot of the low carb guys on the board swear by their diet. I find low carb useful when I'm trying to lose fat, but I wouldn't do it long term - that's just me. As far as which is easier to make energy out of, I'd guess it's a moot question, since (I think) your body will use glycogen reserves before it starts to burn fat, so your body will preferentially use up glycogen first. I'm probably treading on enough thin ice by now, and I don't want to start a flame war. The low carb guys will probably say that once your body is "fat adapted", you'll preferentially burn lipids first. I'll not venture into that territory. If your interested, ask one of them, I'm sure they'll be happy to fill you in. Best of luck.

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