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  1. #1
    Rikard is offline Senior Member
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    Default veggies in diets

    It's been I while since I wrote here but I need clarification in one thing.

    I followed a discussion a few months ago about veggies and humans.

    Someone claimed that we veggies and fruit are made up of cellulose and is therefore useless to us(not counting used for stuffing) because we don't have a working appendix the can brake down cellulose(and the nutrients are attached to the cellulose?).

    Someone else responded by saying that we don't need it since the braking down part is taken cared of in the mouth by the chewing and the saliva.

    now my question is:
    how important are veggies/fruits? can we utilize them properly? are they as good as everyone says?

    thanks
    //rikard

  2. #2
    PRS
    PRS is offline Senior Member
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    Default vegetable benefits and Elvis sightings

    The notion that we can't break down vegetables to beneficially use their nutrients is on par with Elvis sightings.

    Vegetables and fruits (and grains) are important. They are filled with different vitamins, which we know quite a bit about, and with countless phytonutrients, which we are just beginning to learn about.

    Science is just learning about differences we each have in genes, proteins and metabolism. In 50 years or so, many believe that diets and medicine will all be customized, we'll each know exactly how to maximize our health, and we'll each be a bit or a lot different. For now, IMO, play it safe and eat a well-balanced diet with a wide variety of fruits and vegetables.

  3. #3
    IronWarrior518 is offline Senior Member
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    Default vegetable benefits and Elvis sightings

    I agree (besides the whole grain part), contrary to my previous stance on this topic. I used to buy into Eliis' claim that the vitamins and minerals in fruits and veggies cannot be digested by the human body. Ellis is easily proven wrong by the fact that limes can cure scurvy. That's a fact. People with scurvy are cured by eating limes, easily showing that vitamin c is obtained from the limes. If we couldn't get any vitamins from fruits and veggies, the lime treatment wouldn't work for scurvy, but it does. I also think that a lot of low-carb guru's are misleading in the claim that "humans can live off of nothing but meat" in which they often cite the Eskimo's as a prime example. The truth is that it is virtually impossible and unrealistic in our society for one to eat the ENTIRE animal, organs and all. Humans can indeed live off of nothing but meat so long as they eat the entire animal. Most low-carbers eat only muscle meats (and maybe some organic liver or kidneys if they're lucky), which do not contain all of the nutrients required by the human body. So basically, if you try to live off of nothing but muscle meats and fat you'll without a doubt run into a nutritional deficiency. You may say "but what about Steve Maxwell, how come he's an elite athlete and eats only muscle meats and thrives?" and the answer to that is in the amount of supplements that he takes. Steve spends hundreds of dollars on supplements every MONTH. Save yourself the money and just buy some fruits and veggies for a whole natural source of vitamins and minerals.

  4. #4
    jdljon is offline Senior Member
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    Default veggies in diets

    Blueberries, Broccoli and spinach are some of the healthiest fruits and vegetables around. I try to get some greens 2-3 times a day and have a piece or two a day of fruit.

  5. #5
    Komardovich is offline Senior Member
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    Default veggies in diets

    Man evolved from vegetarian primates and can live on a vegetarian diet. Vegetarians on average live 3 to 5 years (or more in some cases) longer than meat eaters. Whoever said man can't digest plant foods is an idiot.

    But it is also clear that man evolved, probably adapting to the ice ages, to eat meat, and even lost the ability to synthesize vitamin B12.

    For optimal health, most people need some combination of animal and plant foods.

  6. #6
    downwardog is offline Member
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    Default veggies in diets

    how important are veggies/fruits? can we utilize them properly? are they as good as everyone says?

    Fruits and vegetables are only as good as the soil in which they grow. The soil in this country is mostly a worthless disaster for growing mineral-dense plants so it is very difficult to maintain optimal levels of nutrition from plant foods. Make that impossible, unless you are working with a cooperative farmer. It's difficult enough to get proper nutrition from animal foods.

    The best plant foods are fermented to increase their available nutrient levels and lessen the burden on the digestive tract. kim chi, baby.

  7. #7
    dkaler is offline Senior Member
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    Default starch vs. cellulose

    Cellulose is the main structural component of plants (vegetables & fruits, grass, trees etc.). Cellulose can't be broken down by the human digestive system, since humans lack the enzyme to do so. However, it's the starch within plants that humans digest. Both cellulose and starch are polymers that contain the glucose molecule. Cattle can access the glucose in grass cellulose since they have the enzyme. Human's access glucose from the starch in vegetables, fruits and grains.

    When you eat an apple, you break down the starch to obtain the glucose. The cellulose is basically the fiber component of the apple. Cotton is over 90% cellulose. So basically, you can digest an apple but not a wad of cotton.

    Here's a link if you're interested. It's geared toward kids, but you can find a good explanation of starch vs. cellulose in a decent Chemistry 101 text book, or an encyclopedia.

    http://www.pslc.ws/mactest/starlose.htm

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