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20 rep squats

RTW

New member
I saw this board and I am slightly familar with Pavel's training, so I thought maybe someone here can answer this question.

I am a 24 year-old powerlifter, 5'10" 220, with 16.5% bodyfat. I am taking some time off from powerlifting to loose fat and gain some mass. I want to be 220 with 7-10% bodyfat.

I am not real familar with the super squat apporoach, I know my legs have responded great from the heavy squats with low reps, but I want to gain more size (thighs are around 30 inches). Has anyone used this routine, and will 20-rep squats really build that much size??
Thanks,
Rick Walker
 

Griff0352

New member
My god, your thighs are as big as my waist. You wanna get bigger? More power to you killer.

Semper Fi,
Comrade Griff
 

Wesley

New member
Rick,

According to some of the Old School trainers, the 20 rep squat will definitely build mass. Not sure why you want the extra mass but since you do go for it! John McCullum (sic) stated in a Milo article that it has to be 20 by God Hard squats, Like what you would usually do for 10 reps and stretch it to 20, I am almost sure that you mass gains are going to go toward your hips and glutes also

Good Luck
 

Dano

New member
Have you really evaluated why you want to gain mass? You can obtain unreal strength with minimal increases in bodyweight.
Dano
 

RTW

New member
Dano-
Right now I am pretty satisfied with my strength. I just feel like I am big but not as muscular as I should be. A lot of guys in my weight class are 220 and ripped and are handling weights that are far beyond my reach (like a recent 1000 pound squat by Chuck V. from Westside, a 733 bench by George Halbert, Also from Westside.)

I feel if I tighten up and try to get my bodyfat down to 7-10% but keep my bodyweight at 220, I will be able to handle more weight. The theory is that more force can be produced by larger muscles, IF the muscles are trained properly. That is why I want to loose fat but gain muscle. The ripped, huge powerlifters always seem to handle more weight then the puffy ones!!
Thans for responding-
Rick Walker
 

RTW

New member
I want the extra muscle mass so i can stay at 220 but lower my bodyfat to be a more productive 220 pound lifter. THanks for responding-
Rick Walker
 

RTW

New member
I want mass, but I want to stay at 220. I want to lower bodyfat, while gaining muscle to become a more productive 220 pound lifter.
Thanks for responding,
Rick Walker
 

Guinness

New member
I've done it and it was the hardest workout I've ever done. I can't say I gained a ton of mass from it, but then I don't put on muscle that easily. Looking back it, was something I'm proud I did (302x20 @ 165 lbs) and it will build a lot of mental toughness, especially when you get to reps 15-20. I think one reason it's legendary for mass is that it will make you absolutely ravenously hungry -- you'll be wanting to (as McCallum said) "eat everything that doesn't bite back". So I don't know that it's the best for someone wanting to lean down.

Besides, it seems to me that a 10-12 RM is too far away from the "powelifting range"... I understand wanting to get bigger, but have you considered Pavel's Bear program? I'd think 10-12 sets of 5 or 6 would keep your weights heavier and still let you get bigger, without the horrible wiped out feeling that all-out 20-rep squats will give you.

But if you want to try it, and you're that big already, I'm sure the 20-reps will bulk you up.... Especially with lots of milk.
 

Guinness

New member
You really need the book, but it's a variation of the regular PTP only with an eye towards mass. You basically do 5 reps for many sets, as many as 15-20. You take little rest between sets. It's kind of like a typical 5 sets of 10 mass program only flipped over -- this way the total weight lifted is much heavier. Many have reported good gains with it... Please check Glenn Sunshine's link under the articles section to the left
 

Dano

New member
Gotcha! I would stick w/ low reps, but just increase the volume. This worked wonders for me years and years before I heard of Pavel. I would do 8-10 sets of squats with a fixed weight for only 2-3 reps, not going to failure. Man, it worked! You probably know more about how often to perform squats but I don't think you can go wrong. Best of luck and keep us posted!
Dano
 

RTW

New member
Yeah, when I am training for powerlifting i train Westside exclusively, gained about 200 pounds on my deadlift, 100 on my squat, and 50 on my bench in about 6 months, drug-free, when I switched to Westside. i love it! All that heavy low back training was a new thing for me and it really paid off.
Rick Walker
 

BillLumberg0021

New member
Increase the number of sets (10-20) on your big 3 and

add some high rep snatches. High-rep one arm snatch will drop the bodyfat (due to high GH release) and help improve your squats and deads since you probably are not doing any ballistic exercises right now.
 

Lemon1

New member
I had a 2 year flirtation with 20 and 30 rep sets of breathing squats - they were the hardest workouts I've ever done, and I would generally either heave into the nearest wastebasket or burst into tears after I finally racked the weight. I gained some mass this way, but the workouts left me so wiped out that I wasn't able to do anything else (except for some walking). I finally had to stop when the tendons above my right knee gave out (a minor 'quad strain') and I couldn't squat to the correct depth for 2 years after that without pain.

Personlly, I think you'd be better off with a 'Bear' style approach, increasing the number of low-rep sets. It's easier to keep your body tight and your concentration focused that way.
 
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