• If this is your first visit, please visit the FAQ. Please register before posting. To start viewing messages, select a forum below.
The world’s premier network for those seeking to share and discuss high-impact,high results, super practical information for the developmentof superiorphysical performance.

Ever cut sugar completely out of your diet?

kbpaul

New member
When I say sugar, I also mean potatoes, white rice, bread & pasta too.
This is what I'm doing starting today! I'll be sure to follow up with the results.

btw, I'm currently 5'8"...193 lbs. body fat= not really sure.
I lift weights 2x a week covering all body parts once a week...I do a HOC workout with kettlebells 2x a week and alternate jump rope with shaddow-kickboxing i.e. Bas Rutten's mma workout. And I go to train with a buddy once a week for Thai pad workout and some stand up sparring along with ground work (grappling sparring).
My goal is to lean out!!!

Like I said, I'll post results of cutting sugar. Btw I'm doing it the warrior diet way.
 

P MacElree RKC

New member
All but oatmeal, yes.

My current diet is just that, no startchy carbs with the excpetion of oatmeal. I still consume carbs and sugar but it all comes from fruits, vegetables, and milk. I don't do it Warrior Diet style though, no reason, just don't.

It has made a drastic difference in my body structure. I leaned out a lot, wouldn't mind a little more, but didn't loose any strength in the process, in fact I probably gained strength as I increased the intensity of my workouts. I don't know what my BF is but I know that I have dropped 2 sizes in clothes.

Let us know how it works out for you.
Pamela
 

Benn14

New member
Good luck

I guess technically, all carbs do get processed into sugar. Good luck, let us know how this turns out. You can do it! I can't, but you can.
 

kbpaul

New member
Good luck

I wouldn't say "all carbs" I will be eatting alot of vegies!

Thanks for the Good Luck wish, I think anyone can do it, it just takes alot of discipline!

If I do good all week long....I will be having one cheat day. lol
 

jdljon

New member
As an aside, their are some carbohydrates that can be helpful in leaning out: oatmeal, sweet potatoes, long grain brown rice, various beans, and whoel wheat pastas. I don't get much more than 120 calories a day from carbs. Green beans and leafy greens are good. Fruit is good, but in limited amounts. Fructose doesn't go directly to the muscles first, and has to be processed in the liver first before the conversion to glucose. When the liver is filled up with glycogen the propensity for fat gain is there. Carbs are the muscles preferred source of energy. Complex carbs like the ones I emntioned don't spike insulin and blood sugar as quickly. If you are going to decrease carbs, I would recomend increasing fish oils and protein intake. Hoc workouts and kettlebell workouts tend to deplete glycogen quickly. Once the glycogen is depleted there is possibility that your muscle tissue will be canabalized, since glucose has to be created from non-carbohydrate sources: muscle tissue or fat. An increase in protein prior and post workout can help mitigate the breakdown of muscle tissue if your carbs are low. Intense kettlebell workouts and HOC workouts (or any of intense repeated anaerobic nature) should increase insulin sensitivity, promote the release of existing bodyfat stores, and increase the efficiency in which carbs are partioned to muscles sources, as opposed to fueling fat sources. You definetly have the workout part down. It is all nutrition from there. You want to maintain as much muscle mass as possible too, keep that in mind. Calipers can come in handy to assess whether your nutrient manipulations are resulting in fat mass being lost. Just my opinion.
 

jdljon

New member
As an aside, their are some carbohydrates that can be helpful in leaning out: oatmeal, sweet potatoes, long grain brown rice, various beans, and whoel wheat pastas. I don't get much more than 120 calories a day from carbs. Green beans and leafy greens are good. Fruit is good, but in limited amounts. Fructose doesn't go directly to the muscles first, and has to be processed in the liver first before the conversion to glucose. When the liver is filled up with glycogen the propensity for fat gain is there. Carbs are the muscles preferred source of energy. Complex carbs like the ones I emntioned don't spike insulin and blood sugar as quickly. If you are going to decrease carbs, I would recomend increasing fish oils and protein intake. Hoc workouts and kettlebell workouts tend to deplete glycogen quickly. Once the glycogen is depleted there is possibility that your muscle tissue will be canabalized, since glucose has to be created from non-carbohydrate sources: muscle tissue or fat. An increase in protein prior and post workout can help mitigate the breakdown of muscle tissue if your carbs are low. Intense kettlebell workouts and HOC workouts (or any of intense repeated anaerobic nature) should increase insulin sensitivity, promote the release of existing bodyfat stores, and increase the efficiency in which carbs are partioned to muscles sources, as opposed to fueling fat sources. You definetly have the workout part down. It is all nutrition from there. You want to maintain as much muscle mass as possible too, keep that in mind. Calipers can come in handy to assess whether your nutrient manipulations are resulting in fat mass being lost. Just my opinion.
 

Blarg

New member
Yeah, I've done that, but a little carbohydrates are still good.

I went to eating almost all steamed or raw fruits and vegetables at one point, and the fat practically sprinted screaming off my body. No muscle loss either.

But I found both my long-term energy level and rate of loss to be influenced by how much I had in the way of rice or potatoes and bread. Nicely, I could eat like an absolute PIG when it was only veggies/fruits, but if I were out for a number of hours, I would definitely need to be pumping food into myself somehow because vegetables give less "staying power" to your energy level than starches and starchy veggies and, for some of us, meat.

Sugar and salt I've gone without having in my cupboard for a decade at a time.

You might want to not go so nutty all at once, but just do something you can maintain and that won't leave you at low energy. I had a friend who did all veggies and often looked and felt on the verge of fainting. His concentration fell, his mood fell, etc. Sure, he lost weight, but..so what? You can still get fantastic results, and I do mean fantastic, by just eating starches very moderately and staying away from dairy, fatty foods, prepared foods, deserts and sweets, and red meat. You don't have to eliminate starchy foods entirely, just keep them quite moderate. Believe me, it was incredible how well that worked for me. But there's no point ruining your quality of life by being constantly out of gas because of radical dieting. Fruits and veggies aren't radical, and neither are moderate starches. But your weight will drop very quickly and sensibly by sticking to starches in moderate amounts and all you can eat of non-starchy fruits and veggies.
 

Blarg

New member
same with me

Just getting my carbs from veggies and staying very light on the starches did the same thing to me. Totally stripped away the fat, but didn't do anything to my muscle, since I was actually getting enough protein and ate all the fruit and veggies I wanted to, so calories in general were fine. My energy was great, too.
 

Rikard

New member
starches?

Sorry for this question, but I'm having trouble translating starches.
What is it and where can I find it ?
is it the same as fiber?

thanks
//rikard
 

dkaler

New member
No, it's not the same

Here's a link:

http://www.pslc.ws/macrog/kidsmac/starlose.htm

Basically, plants contain cellulose and starch. Humans lack the enzymes to break down the cellulose, so it get's passed through the system undigested (that's where the fiber comes in). However, humans do have the enzyme to break the starch molecule down to obtain the glucose. So basically, we obtain the nutrients from fruits and vegetables from the starch. (There was some talk on the board a while back about people not possessing the enzyme to break cellulose down - true, but it's the starch that's actually digested, which I think was left out of the discussion).
 

Rikard

New member
difference?

ok, think i've got starches down. bur what is the difference between starches and carbohydrates? isn't both used for energy? which one is best/most suitable for humans?

thanks
//rikard
 

dkaler

New member
difference?

Basically, starch is a subclassification of a classification of carbohydrates:

Carbohydrates can be classified as:

Monosaccharides - which can't be broken down into a simpler form of carbohydrate (e.g. glucose and fructose).

Disaccharides - which are formed from two monosaccharides (e.g. maltose has 2 units of glucose, and sucrose has a glucose and a fructose unit).

Polysaccharides - which contain several hundred to several thousand monosaccharide units (e.g. cellulose and starch).
 

amg455

New member
So, you did a vegetarian diet and so did your friend? And he had no energy from it? Seems about right...
 

Rikard

New member
so on a low-carb diet..

where you basically get your carbs from veggies and fruit you would get Polysaccharides and Monosaccharides?
Anyone of those three you should try to get as much/low as possible of?

i think i've read that fructose goes directly to the liver and creates a spike which other carbs don't do, right or wrong?

thanks for your help
//Rikard
 

dkaler

New member
As I understand it

Fruits and veggies provide starch, which is a polysaccharide. The polysaccharides (or other carbohydrates for that matter) are broken down by enzymes (digestive enzymes are present in the salivary glands, the stomach,the pancreas and the small intestine) into their constituent glucose molecules, which the body uses as "fuel". The final step occurs in the small intestine - the glucose is basically absorbed by the intestinal epithelium. From there it goes into the interstitial fluid, then to the capillaries, and finally it's transported to the liver via the hepatic portal vein. The liver basically acts to stabilize blood glucose levels. If glucose levels decline, glycogen reserves are broken down by the liver to form glucose, which is released into the bloodstream. If blood glucose levels rise, the liver removes glucose from circulation and stores it as glycogen or uses it to synthesize lipids (fat). Glucose basically provides energy. Thanks - I needed that little review of digestive physiology myself ;)
 

Rikard

New member
just a little bit more....

Thanks for your info so far.

If I now eat 70% carbs and 30% fat (hypothetical) all that carb is used for energy and if I don't need energy it will convert to fat and save it along with the fat from the meal(as I understand it).

But if I turn the numbers around(30% carbs and 70% fat), that means I don't have that available energy (except for that 30%)in my stomach so my body begins to break down fat into energy?

Is there such a thing as carb-malnutrion (ie can you get ill if the body doesn't get carbs), can you go too far in letting you body eat fat?

Which is easiest to make energy out of(carbs or fat)?

thanks
//rikard
 

Blarg

New member
He did the Fit for Life diet. He wouldn't eat most anything, and was much more radical than most vegetarians by far. He would eat all kinds of foods separately so they wouldn't produced supposed horrible effects by being in the stomach at the same time. This made his meals very unbalanced and more than a little dull and simple. He would say things like, "you can get all the protein you'll need all day be eating an apple!" Oh, he lost plenty of weight all right. But he looked like death, and it was actually kind of scary to look in his eyes sometimes, because he would be going along fine for a bit and then just seem to crash out really hard, just getting slack and unfocussed and devoid of energy, sometimes looking absolutely panicked. His friends and family had several sort-of "interventions" to try to get some sense into him.

I've had various variations on vegetarianism and near-vegetarianism. At the time I was mentioning in the post above, I would eat meat very occasionally, usually either tuna or skinless chicken, and ate red meat rarely. I wasn't fanatical about it; I just found myself doing fine without it.

Mostly I just cut way back on starchy foods like pasta, bread, rice, and potatoes. I got protein from eating a very wide variety of veggies and beans and tofu. And I ate as much as I wanted, whenever I wanted. It's almost impossible to gain weight eating a very high proportion of fruits and vegetables; it's the sauces and oils and fats and starches that get you. Not to mention deserts and casual snacking or thoughtless mechanical eating even when you're not hungry, which is a pretty common vice I never got into.

I often used butter or margarine in sauces, but considering how low calorie everything else I ate was, it didn't add up to much at all. And when I ate salads, I would use rice vinegar or lemon juice or vinegar and (just a bit of) oil dressings. I got into different herbs a lot, to spice things up, and the food was actually pretty flavorful. Garlic, onion, thyme, rosemary, peppers, parsley, fennel, basil, whatever.

I took care to get enough protein, and felt truly great. One really nice thing about eating like that is that you can eat like a total pig, not deprive yourself or feel hungry. Losing weight while eating as much as you like is a pretty neat trick, but much more possible than most people think. Even a little bit of eating crap like fast food or a lot of starch or fats can screw you over really quickly, but cut back on the garbage and cut back on the starches and there's not really anywhere for the fat to come from. You can eat an enormous amount of vegetables without putting on any weight.
 

dkaler

New member
Well

I wish I could answer those questions. As far as your body using fat for energy, yes it can and it will. Matter of fact, lipids (fats) are important energy reserves, and on the average they'll provide twice as much energy as carbs, gram for gram, when they're broken down by the body (note that fat has 9 kcals per gram, carbs have 4). As far as the optimum amount of carbs vs. fat etc., it's a tough call, imo. I do pretty much a 25% fat, 40% protein, 35% carb diet (on average). Alot of the low carb guys on the board swear by their diet. I find low carb useful when I'm trying to lose fat, but I wouldn't do it long term - that's just me. As far as which is easier to make energy out of, I'd guess it's a moot question, since (I think) your body will use glycogen reserves before it starts to burn fat, so your body will preferentially use up glycogen first. I'm probably treading on enough thin ice by now, and I don't want to start a flame war. The low carb guys will probably say that once your body is "fat adapted", you'll preferentially burn lipids first. I'll not venture into that territory. If your interested, ask one of them, I'm sure they'll be happy to fill you in. Best of luck.
 
Free Course
Top