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I just want to know here I stand...

ad5ly

New member
...and the internet was of no help. What I mean I want to know how my bench press strength/poundage measures up to the average man of 50+ years ( I will be 60 in Dec). The problem is WHAT IS AVERAGE? I determined that it would be grossly unfair to compare myself to to men who do not strength train. Or have no interest in strength training. Have physical disabilities. Or are older than Noah. That leaves the gym goers. Problem is - that going to the gym is many things to many people - and lifting weights may not not be what they do. The only group to compare myself fairly to would be power lifters who practice regularly. But many train at home and shun gyms. The data is not there. No comparisons can be made. SO I DECIDED TO JUST WORRY ABOUT ME. FORGET ABOUT WHATS "OUT THERE"....Has anyone tried to get an accurate gauge on where they stand via the internet? I don't think its possible..So I will just shut up and keep lifting..hehe!!...Dennis
 

AndrewR

New member
We don't bench at my place but most of my clients can front squat bw with good form, maybe a little more, but around there. The guys tend to DL somewhere between 100-140kg for 3-5 reps for multiple sets with good form. The closest we would come would be KB press for pressing and most are around the 16kg-24kg mark for sets of 3-5. Push ups the goal is 5 sets of 10 solid chest to ground push ups and I'd say we're about 50/50 for most clients.

Based off what I've seen over the years most seem to have a squat and bench about equal, so I'd offer that if your squat is above bw and your bench is about the same then you're doing alright.
 

Moses Correa

New member
Dennis first may I say I agree with Andrew. However the general guideline for Bp if 1 and 1/2 body-weight as Being strong. It just matters on the group of people that you lift with and what you want from your fitness.
 

ad5ly

New member
I guess the problem is that "average" cannot be accurately defined. Even with a single exercise such as the BP. Barbell vs machine. Good form vs bouncing bar off chest. Most of us instantly recognise real strength when we see it. AVERAGE is harder to recognise due to all the different populations (age, experience, physical abilities ). The internet is all over the place with what average is. So it could be that the truely best yardstick is yourself. I know that for instance that I am significantly stronger in lifting at 59 than when I was 29. But I have much more information on training now. At 29 I was much better with endurance (running, pushups, situps) but I now am clearly stronger with my lifts...Dennis
 

MostlyFull

New member
Dennis,

Just laying on a bench and pressing a barbell upward at 59 years of age makes you above average. Most men your age are too busy putting butt prints into their easy chair to bother with things like exercise, let alone intense training.

Being 56 myself, I long ago stopped comparing what I can do versus someone else. With such a small sampling as to the people around me, there is always someone better, usually many worse.

I compete against myself and against time. Although I haven't lifted anything heavier than a kb in almost a year, I am bigger and stronger due to CC. My fitness is far better using kb swings and snatches. I am better in size, strength, and fitness than at any other point in my life. I know the improvements won't last forever, but I fully intend to be dragged kicking and screaming into what we call old age. And the competition goes on......
 

PA KETTLE

New member
Here is some feedback for Dennis. I, too, am 60 and continue to practice hard with KB (floor presses, overhead presses, swings, etc) and barbell (dead lifts). Doing hundreds of pullups each month. Bench presses? I try a few, very carefully, about once a year. Poundage is not spectacular. If I was having a great day, I might bench press my own weight. That exercise seems risky for shoulder health for older guys, so I am avoiding the bench press to avoid injury. Maybe I am overly concerned, but I am still getting stronger without breaking down.
 

RolandasPT4U

New member
Those serious about power lifting should be able to bench press one rep max of their body weight times 2 or 160kg, squat body weight times 2.5 or 200kg and dead lift body weight times 2.75 or 220kg. From may practice I can say, common weight training enthusiast should have at least own body weight as bench press working weight (for about 8 reps) and accordingly more on squat and dead lift.
 

ad5ly

New member
I guess an average bp would be around 145lbs for a healthy male age 35 who has about 2 months of proper training. Heavier men might lift more. But more often than not being heavier does not translate to heavier lifts. As was mentioned strong or very strong lifts of 1.5 to 2.5 times on big lifts is a good standard. Average would also include those who are unskilled at the outset of training but have genetic potential or the mental toughness and desire to excell at a much faster rate. Average cannot be framed or neatly packaged as there are too many variables ...Dennis
 

Wolfeye

Banned
Well, how much can you do? I'd figure a one-armed handstand push-up would be a good thing to shoot for. That's a double bodyweight bench press & much more than a lot of people do, so I figure decent would be a bit less than that (maybe a quarter more than your bodyweight).
 

ad5ly

New member
A few weeks ago I tested my 1rep max at 235 lbs without a spotter. I believe I could have gone heavier but erred on the side of caution . Not a competitive lifter here - just want to improve myself and I believe I have. Lifting heavir bp now than I did 30 years ago. Just shows you that knowledge is power.
 
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