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Ivanko Super Gripper vs. Captains of Crush Grippers?

Ideal Paradigm

New member
I have been looking into supplementary grip training and I have come across this gripper that looks like it is very versatile. Not only can you use it for crush grip, you can use it for pinch grip as well.

You can also adjust an amazing amount of increments, and thus train your progressive overload.

I just wanted to know if anybody on this forum has used the Ivanko Super Gripper and how it compares to the Captains of Crush grippers?

I found some websites that actually calculated out the poundages of each resistance setting on the Ivanko Super Gripper, and the increments are smaller than the Captains of Crush.

Edit: Another question, what are the different types of training effects you will see if you hold the gripper upside down (torsion spring closer to your pinky finger) as opposed to right side up (torsion spring closer to your index finger)?

Any input would be appreciated, thanks.
 
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inferno

New member
I got a Woody Super Griper a couple weeks ago, wich I think is the same as the Ivanko.
Yes, it is very versatile and allows for you to regulate better the increments as you progress.
I cant really compare to the COC because I never experimented with this ( I started grip training recently) but i think i made a good choice, and the disconfort some people talk about is not big deal (at least for the 3 or 4 workouts i made with it) just start easy out on your first tries.
 

Mr.Q

New member
The Woody vice gripper is similar to the ISG but I like it better because it comes with the COC style gripper attachments. I really like the ISG, it's affordable and it's versatile. But I still prefer the torsion style grippers for working crushing strength. If you're looking to certify then you'll obviously need to get a few COC's at some point. But if you're just looking for some supplemental grip work then by all means get the ISG/Vice Gripper.

Also, take any sort of poundage ratings pertaining to grippers with a grain of salt. Closing a 195 lb. setting on the ISG doesn't necessarily mean you'll be able to close a #2 COC.
 

Steve W.

New member
I have the Ivanko Super Gripper as well as a set of COC grippers.

I never touch the Ivanko.

It just doesn't feel as good in the hand and it is much more annoying to adjust the springs than to just reach for a different COC. A good idea in theory, but an inferior tool in practice (IMO).
 

Zach Coulter

New member
The Ivanko is a no go. The adjustability is usually what people look at first instead of buying a number of grippers, but it's just not the same. The few times I've used the ISG, I've been very unimpressed. If you want a better alternative to buying a bunch of grippers, then check out David Horne's Vulcan Gripper. It's expensive to ship outside the UK, but it's a FANTASTIC piece of equipment. Feels almost exactly like a well-oiled torsion spring gripper in your hand, the set is tough so it forces you to get better at one of the hardest parts of the gripper close, and it's infinitely more adjustable than the ISG. It comes with a spring, but you could order a second spring, you could put rubber bands around the top with the spring and build up to the next level VERY gradually if you so chose. I really can't say enough about it.

I'd also caution you against the Ironmind grippers. I've recently heard some less than stellar and extremely unprofessional stories about their customer service. Instead, go with the man who made the original CoC's and is largely responsible for grip's popularity today, Warrent Tetting. The Advanced is about a #1, the Master is about a #2 in strength, the Grand Master is a tad easier than most #3's, the Elite is always harder than most #3's, and the Grand Elite is basically a hard #4.

If the Vulcan is out of your price range and you still don't want to buy a few grippers at a time, the ISG is a good alternative, but not for overall handstrength.
 

Ideal Paradigm

New member
I'd also caution you against the Ironmind grippers. I've recently heard some less than stellar and extremely unprofessional stories about their customer service. Instead, go with the man who made the original CoC's and is largely responsible for grip's popularity today, Warrent Tetting. The Advanced is about a #1, the Master is about a #2 in strength, the Grand Master is a tad easier than most #3's, the Elite is always harder than most #3's, and the Grand Elite is basically a hard #4.

Advice taken.

Another question, what are the different types of training effects you will see if you hold the gripper upside down (torsion spring closer to your pinky finger) as opposed to right side up (torsion spring closer to your index finger)?

Any more input is greatly appreciated, all this information so far is great, thank you all.
 

xafier

New member
That Vulcan Gripper looks great, I was thinking about buying some more Robert Baraban grippers as I am close to closing my 130ip one, but the Vulcan Gripper looks a much better option!
 

wv2de

New member
I have a CoC #1 (my hand feels better now after overdoing it at first...). I have found that choking up on the handle slightly and/or closing without positioning or assisting with the alternate hand (no credit card width check) will make the single gripper as good as having 4+ different 'settings'. If I choke up so my hand is hanging slightly over the top of the handles, I cannot close the gripper - therefore I do not need another gripper until I can do that.

4 suggested difficulty levels to progress with from easiest to hardest:

1: choke down (away from spring), position to credit card width (certification start)
2: choke down, start completely open
3: choke up, position to credit card width
4: choke up, start completely open

Obviously you can vary your starting width and choke more than this, but this gives you the basic idea, and this is how I'm using my gripper to get the most benefit.

Good luck!

wv
 
Zach is dead on! The ISG is crap. You get what you pay for, its cheap and is too far out of groove for any real grip application. The only thing the super gripper is good for is building better SG closes.

and who cares about that...

Get tetting grippers
 

Ideal Paradigm

New member
Zach is dead on! The ISG is crap. You get what you pay for, its cheap and is too far out of groove for any real grip application. The only thing the super gripper is good for is building better SG closes.

and who cares about that...

Get tetting grippers

Mr. Glass, is there any difference in training results when you train with the crush gripper upside down (spring near pinky) or right side up (spring near index finger)? And which one is recommended for just general grip training, rather than specialization?
 

bencrush

New member
Totally agree with the recommendation to go with the David Horne Vulcan adjustable gripper. It's the best adjustable gripper out there. I've tried the ISG and it's better than using silly putty I guess. I have also closed a bunch of #3s and above and the Vulcan is the only one that really feels similar to closing a torsion spring gripper.
 

Ideal Paradigm

New member
Totally agree with the recommendation to go with the David Horne Vulcan adjustable gripper. It's the best adjustable gripper out there. I've tried the ISG and it's better than using silly putty I guess. I have also closed a bunch of #3s and above and the Vulcan is the only one that really feels similar to closing a torsion spring gripper.

There seems to be a common trend that torsion spring grippers are the best in this thread, is there a reason for this? Or some sort of logic behind the superiority of torsion springs for grip training?
 
There seems to be a common trend that torsion spring grippers are the best in this thread, is there a reason for this? Or some sort of logic behind the superiority of torsion springs for grip training?

IP

The reason is Ben, Zach, and myself say it is because torsion grippers are part of the bigger picture of hand strength and grip sport. So if the three of us are having a contest or something- we are would want to be on the same page for events. We would not have a competition where Ben compares his COC 3.5 close to Zach's squat, to my press (would make no sense)

Torsion grippers are all more or less the same, important fact if your goal is closing big grippers. The ISG is not the same, and as such it will not produce the same results. Back squats vs. Leg press. Either can go in your program for "leg day" but which one would you use if you want to compete as a Power lifter?
 

inferno

New member
Hey Adam, so you're saying that if someone wants to close the CoC 3 as their goal, the ISG will have zero carryover? Is there any use for this supergrippers? (damn, i think i just throwed money away).
what about finger curls? how can those be compared to CoC or ISG.
 

Mr.Q

New member
Hey Adam, so you're saying that if someone wants to close the CoC 3 as their goal, the ISG will have zero carryover? Is there any use for this supergrippers? (damn, i think i just throwed money away).
what about finger curls? how can those be compared to CoC or ISG.

Don't jump the gun there. I wouldn't say you threw your money away. It's a crush grip tool and I do think there is some carry over.
 

bencrush

New member
Hey Adam, so you're saying that if someone wants to close the CoC 3 as their goal, the ISG will have zero carryover? Is there any use for this supergrippers? (damn, i think i just throwed money away).
what about finger curls? how can those be compared to CoC or ISG.
I'm not Adam, but I don't think there's much carryover to the TSGs from the ISG. I know a few guys who train exclusively with the ISG and only one of them is closing #3s or harder and that's probably because he spent a lot of time training with them before buying his ISG. That doesn't mean it can't be done. But it does mean it's not the most effective way to get that crushing strength you obviously are shooting for. The ISG just doesn't have the same "feel" as the TSGs and therefore really won't have a ton of carryover.
 

Zach Coulter

New member
The more you work with grippers and the tougher the grippers you begin to use, the more you'll find that the often touted "groove" truly is all-important. Training on the ISG WILL make your hands stronger, but it has very little carryover to anything else because of the absence of that "groove". I know gents who have closed the ISG on the hardest setting and added more springs and still weren't #3 closers until they worked with torsion springs for awhile. There is something about Torsion spring grippers that just makes you strong. As Adam said, it's like a leg press vs. a back squat. Do you see many strongmen/PLers using the leg press? Those who have gone through and found what works for them and done what they needed to do to become stronger have all migrated to the torsion spring grippers for a reason; They are superior in practically every way. The only real downside is having to have a few of them to progress and a bunch of them to really get strong.

BTW, that's where the Vulcan Gripper came in. Horne is an innovator and has been holding grip comps longer than pretty much anyone. He knows his stuff. He made the Vulcan for just that exact reason, buy one tool and work from great grandmother handstrength to monster handstrength. There is no one on earth who can close the Vulcan at it's highest level, not a soul. Everyone can close it on it's easiest setting, a 90 yr old woman could. You just don't find that kind of adjustability in a legitimate strength tool often. I'm not making any money off of endorsing his stuff either, I just think it's that good.
 

Ideal Paradigm

New member
Alright, so I'm guessing that torsion spring grippers are better.

My decision is now split between the Vulcan Gripper and the Torsion Spring Grippers. I think the deal maker would be, how much money am I willing to spend? Because a torsion spring gripper is cheaper than the Vulcan (Vulcan is UK and is more expensive), but I would need multiple torsion spring grippers compared to just buying one Vulcan gripper.

I'm not going to specialize in gripping power, I would just like to get a stronger grip.

The Vulcan Gripper is about $110-$120 to ship to the USA.

I could get probably 4-5 grippers for that price.

Also, for the Vulcan Gripper, I see that it only comes with one spring, is that all I need if I decide to buy that?
 

xafier

New member
I recently bought a Vulcan gripper, its very good in terms of feel... admittedly, I can't quite close it even on its easiest setting, shows what girly grip strength I currently have haha

On its easiest setting its on a par with my 130ip Robert Baraban gripper, of which I also have a 70ip and 100ip. When I first got them I couldn't close the 100ip, now I can close it 10+ times, and getting very close to closing the 130ip!

According to Horne he is working on a US supplier / maker which would make it easier and cheaper for you to get one, perhaps you should contact him on his forum?

David Horne's World of Grip Chat Forum
 
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