• If this is your first visit, please visit the FAQ. Please register before posting. To start viewing messages, select a forum below.
The world’s premier network for those seeking to share and discuss high-impact,high results, super practical information for the developmentof superiorphysical performance.

Questionable Advice from Doc

Bradley

New member
Just got back from a physiatrist.

I've been having knee trouble for years and I've been over it here before.

But I just had a doctor(physiatrist) tell me never to squat below parallel ever again. And to just do light stuff for 6 weeks - bicycle, walking, etc. Nothing load bearing to see if things get better. I've taken that much time off before, only because of discouragement to no significant effect though.

Should I seek help elsewhere or listen to him.
 

booksbikesbeer

New member
Hmm, hard to say. Would you call this doctor fit? Someone who understands working out? For me, that always raises their credibility, even when it was a dentist who was taking out my wisdom teeth, I felt better knowing that he lifts and does triathlons (looked it, too).

Also, what is he basing this advice off of? Did he just feel around and physically exam you, or did he take x-rays, MRI, those kinds of things? If he knows you've got a certain type of damage in there, don't work out. If not, well, I'd probably be inclined to at least talk to some other people.

Good luck. This kind of stuff sucks.
 

BillLumbergRKC

New member
good points ^. ideally you'd find a doctor who is currently a powerlifter or olympic lifter. next best would be an ex PLer or OLer. then an ex college fb player or track athlete. take home message--a doctor that has minimal or ZERO experience squatting below parallel has a questionable basis from which to advise against it. make sense?
 

Bradley

New member
good points ^. ideally you'd find a doctor who is currently a powerlifter or olympic lifter. next best would be an ex PLer or OLer. then an ex college fb player or track athlete. take home message--a doctor that has minimal or ZERO experience squatting below parallel has a questionable basis from which to advise against it. make sense?

Does someone keep a list of these people? Nice advice, but I've never met one of these people.
 

BillLumbergRKC

New member
good question. There should be, but if not, some phone calls and cyber stalking should help. After some work, I managed to find a spine specialist who's into crossfit--led to a different diagnosis, not to mention a different rehab approach.
 

Bradley

New member
good question. There should be, but if not, some phone calls and cyber stalking should help. After some work, I managed to find a spine specialist who's into crossfit--led to a different diagnosis, not to mention a different rehab approach.

I don't know where to begin. I don't even know what type of doctor I need to see. Or maybe that doesn't matter so much as finding any doctor with some athletic prowess.
 

BillLumbergRKC

New member
depends on your insurance. If it's covered, I'd recommend something like Steadman Hawkins. http://www.shcdenver.com/ It appears they have clinics in other areas along with Denver and Vail. I'd imagine you can find an orthopedic clinic that deals with athletes in your area... usually you can find doctor bios on websites and such. If that's insufficient, resort to the old fashioned call and ask method. The real issue here--lots of people (doctors, trainers, average joe at the gym) have jumped on the "deep squats are bad for your knees" bandwagon so early on that they have not kept an open mind to the possibility that there are more variables involved than just depth, let alone have they ever done deep squats properly. To paraphrase Dan John--Squats aren't bad for your knees. Whatever is it you're doing there is bad for your knees."
I'm not saying your current doc's recommendations are wrong. Deep squatting very well may be a thing of the past for you. However, it's hard to know with much confidence until you get the opinion of someone who has the academic knowledge AND in the trenches experience. Good luck man. This stuff sucks.
 

Karl F. Vorwerk

New member
Speaking of such Dr.s. My Dr. is a marathoner, He used to complain about my lack of cardio till I started doing my mountain cardio. My orthopeadic surgeon has had rotator cuff surgery and does cardio on the same mountain I do. My dentist is an exgymnast.
My Dr. was a lucky accident. The others were recomendations from friends I work out with.
I think that's the best way to find your Dr.
 

mattyg2787

New member
Did he tell you what was wrong with your knees or that you just shouldn't squat?
I knew there are a few conditions that actually stop you from squatting safely, but generally, proper squat for is good for your knees, you strengthen the surrounding muscle offering more support as well as keeping your muscles stretched and not pulling on the knee itself.
I'd look for a sport Physio in particular. If your in Canberra Australia I can recommend an excellent one. I've had friends who after tearing their ACL and needing a full reconstruction, have used squatting as part of their rehab (not heavy to start with obviously)
 
If the doctor you go to is giving you advice but they themselves are overweight or out of shape themselves than I would take what they say with a grain of salt.
 

Wolfeye

Banned
Letting your knees debilitate for that long would probably give you problems, thus a repeat cost (but that's a topic in & of itself). A good knee exercise (but be careful to go down lower & lower gradually, because it is a decently intense exercise when you get to that level) is lean backs. You start off on both knees, then lower yourself up & down, but only bending at the knees. You can increase the difficulty by sticking your arms out, then over your head (or using a weight). You can also do these as holds for time. Whenever my knees started getting screwed up, these would fix them up. Also, plyometrics (just jumping up & down or in different directions seemed to do something different- not entirely sure what, but it made them feel less "loose." It was like it kept it more "snug/held together."). When you get to a new level, stay at it for a week, or so. That'll give the tendons time to develop & you won't run into injuries from doing too much too fast. Maybe that was the problem, all along.

Not entirely sure what it does, specifically, but something you may want to try (I've heard that it works the knee solidity at a different angle) is twisting squats. As you lower yourself, swivel your feet so you knee & ankle will cross at the bottom (your knee is next to the outside of your shin bone). This can be done explosively or slowly, with or without weight. Like I said, I'm not really sure what it's supposed to do for that (maybe unfurling your knee in that way is somewhat like a leanback?), but it does feel different than a regular squat. Use your own discretion, but first two usually worked for me. Maybe another one is to do full range squats, but go up & down a few times in the areas you have trouble with (it's probably hardest in the middle). This maybe solidifies things in that range that may not be so strong. Take a little rest if you need to, but don't make a regular pace out of it. Things start to atrophy like that.
 
Free Course
Top