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Side Press and BP/ Back Health?

fusionman

New member
I recently read that doing these presses opens up vulnerability to disc herniation; I've been doing them for a while and only have felt stronger, but just wanted some others info... I probably read it from someone who was just scared of the movement. Please fill me in on opinions of these exercises, Thanks a lot.
-Nick
 

Bill McPherson

New member
I can't comment on the medical effects of these drills. I will say that I don't think that Pavel would recomend exersices that would later leave you weak and cripple. I hear the same crap about injuries all the time with the deadlift. My response is always if you deadlift with good form and technique it is a perfectly safe lift. I would think the same about the bent press. Arthur Saxon and his brothers were certainly not crippled from bent pressing.
 

Matt Schwartz

New member
I think they improve back health

I love doing the bent press and windmills because they make my back feel better. I think a general commonsense rule of thumb is that a movement will hurt over time before you blow something out. So, if you do something often and it makes you feel better, you are probably not jeopardizing your discs. Just my gut feeling. Not a clinician.

And, don't try something this taxing and technique-intensive if you already have pain. It's a more advanced exercise. Take care of the basic back health, strength, and flexibility first.

One more point that Pavel has made (in BB) is that it is important to sometimes do exercises that are not "safe" in order to prepare for getting into unsafe positions in sports or life. It's like taking little amounts of poison in order to get resistance over time. So, things like the bent press make you get into funky less biomechanically adavantageous positions but if you start slow you build up a tolerance and get stronger and more durable.

Matt
 

Bill McPherson

New member
To quote BB...

On page 79 of BB the last sentence reads "Because it is one of the best moves to work all your core muscles and to make you back injury resistant."
The question was why should you bent press. Let the nay sayers say nay and be content with being weak.
 

DrSlick

New member
chiropractic viewpoint

As I am approx. 1 month into KB's I cant comment too much. But I got into the chiropractic business due to a back injury in college.

I was having some pain with swings when I started, but after spending 2 hours with a certified RKC I have a much better understanding and mechanics of the swing, sidepress and windmill. Although I watched Pavel's tape, my form was far from correct.

I would reccomend that anyone with back pain spend the extra money to train with a RKC. I now have no increased back pain from doing swings and windmills.
 
R

rifstonian

Guest
I was terrified of windmills when I first saw them

and swore I would never do them, having herniated a disc in 2000. It looked like the WORST possible thing I could do for my back- heck, flexion and rotation is what EVERBODY tell you to stay away from.

It wasnt til Brett Jones showed me the correct way to do them that I saw( and felt) that the load ISNT in the spine but the hips.Now they are one of my favorite movements and have opened up my hips to new levels as well as really fixing an imbalance in my spinal rotation.I had no left to right rotation and consistently working on my windmills and windmill stretches have really helped me out.

this is a foundation exercise as far as I am concerned but it MUST be learned correctly to be done safely.Find an RKC.

rif
 

Frankie

New member
Totally agree, Rif..

The focus of kettlebells is hip loading - not spinal flexion/extension under loading. Although there is some, it is minimized by hip mobility. Most of the time (under load) we are stabilizing the spine in many different planes. Nate quoted McGill with something to the effect of - "athletes bend at the hips, not the spine."

F.Dallas Kettlebell Classes
 
R

rifstonian

Guest
I like that quote frankie,

thanks. "athletes bend at the hips, not the spine". and to which I would add,"and therefore so should everyone".
 

Matt Schwartz

New member
Right on!

Yup, I think spinal rotation is overlooked in a lot of training, and one of the key muscles involved in spinal rotation (actually torsional stabilization of the spine) is the multifidus, which is implicated as under-recruited in many folks with back pain. This exercise maked all the difference for me. See the book "The Multifidus Solution" for more.
Great input Rif and Frankie!
Matt
 
R

rifstonian

Guest
Matt

I think you are right on,especially considering the one dimensional twisting that goes on in most sports. Gymnastics is one extreme with all twisting taking place in one direction, with high forces. But if you think about all throwing sports require spinal rotation in only one direction its no wonder so many have back problems.tennis, golf,baseball,shotput, discus, javelin ,etc.

I know gymnasts would highly benefit from windmills and side presses to balance out hip,shoulder and rotational forces in their "not used" twisting direction.
 
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