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TGU's fixin' my shoulders and a question

baederp

New member
I have been plagued by shoulder issues for the past couple of years. Lately, I have been managing shoulder impingment on the left and a torn labrum on the right. However, I started focusing on heavy Turkish Get-Ups and my shoulders feel better than they have in a long time! Today, I was able to go 12:00 with the 40kg and my shoulders didn't pop once.

I am curious what Turkish Get-Up protocols beyond ETK others are having success with.

Also, during some lifts I grit my teeth and have started wearing a mouth guard to prevent any damage to my teeth. I am concerned about CFCs getting into my system from the mouth guard. Does anyone know of a mouth guard that is CFC free?

Thanks.

Patrick Baeder
 

md corral

New member
Hey Patrick- 40kg for 12 min is some serious work. Did you switch hands every rep?

I had a torn labrum in my right shoulder and some AC joint arthritis. Had surgery just over a year ago and got 4 stitches in the labrum. The shoulder is healing up pretty well and I've recently started some snatch work.

TGU's have helped me for sure...before and after the injury/ surgery. RKC Armbars have never seemed to do anything great for me. Some of Dan John's suggestions have been very helpful: Waiter Walks, Suitcase Carries, Bottom's Up Clean Hold Walks (See the cover of Andrea's Ageless Body book).

Waiter Walks have felt the best. I'm still experimenting with them and have done them for a cool down a few times per week for the last couple weeks. Mark Rif also has recently talked about Snatch Holds in his blog.

As far as the torn labrum, my shoulder was just plain not working right until I got it operated on. And I tried a whole bunch of stuff to fix it with no progress.

Good luck!
 

baederp

New member
Yes, I was switching every rep. The 40 is the heaviest KB I have. Any heavier and I am going to have to move up to barbell TGU's. If this progress continues, my shoulders will be 100% plus very soon.
 

ya_bolek

New member
Hey Patrick- 40kg for 12 min is some serious work. Did you switch hands every rep?

I had a torn labrum in my right shoulder and some AC joint arthritis. Had surgery just over a year ago and got 4 stitches in the labrum. The shoulder is healing up pretty well and I've recently started some snatch work.
Good luck!

Can you recommend anything to heal specifically AC joint?
Thomas
 

Future

New member
Sorry I don't have an answer to your question. I wanted to ask my own on this subject.

I have been rehabbing my shoulder using TGU's, I have worked up to 10 mins alternating reps with the 24kg bell. Where do I go from here?

I tried a few reps with the 28kg but that's all I had. Would I be better off building volume with the 28 or going for longer with the 24? Or maybe doing 2 reps per side with the 24 before switching?
 

GeoffreyLevens

New member
I popped my AC years ago in bad martial arts fall. Displaced clavicle upward a fair bit. Sensei pressed down hard on it w/ gauze pad and tapped it into place. Hurt like a mo'fo'. Then I went to a sports medicine chiro and he told me that tapping like that would not make it mend but only slow the healing and that surgery to wire it together greatly increases chance of future arthritis. His recommendation was rest it until not painful and then forget about it but don't do dips and similar. Somehow the bump from my clavicle is about 95%+ gone. Not sure why but I think TGU's and conscientious shoulder packing during training for 18 months just strengthened things and reset my whole shoulder girdle structure. I have no other explanation as AC damage was basically treated only by a couple weeks rest.
 

DLS

New member
I have no other explanation as AC damage was basically treated only by a couple weeks rest.

Many years ago I was a paramedic working in a level one trauma center. One evening, after slinging up and discharging a patient with an AC separation, I asked the treating physician (one of the areas best orthopedic surgeons) why "nothing" was ever done with clavicular injuries such as yours. He said something along the lines of "if both sides of the injury are 'within the same room' they will find a way to heal themselves just fine".

He went on to say "that the musculature of that region is such that it acts as a natural splint and will pull everything back into line quite nicely if given rest and anti-inflammatory drug treatment. Even if the alignment does not end up 'quite perfect', this is still a far better result than 'going in there' and potentially causing all sorts of other long-term damage."

So sometimes "nothing" is something afterall!
 
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GeoffreyLevens

New member
Interesting DLS. Mine still had a moderate displacement years later, I think it was maybe 15 years to pretty much vanish. But gone it is. Smart doc there. Too many are in love w/ the scalpel. Maybe more the surgeons..."When the only tool you have is a hammer..."
 

Rambodoc

New member
Not really, Geoffrey! These things are not based on one's whims: there is a defined treatment or set of options for each injury. For the clavicle it is non-operative.
Personally speaking, I have developed slightly better understanding of this complex joint and its mechanics. For our (lifting) purposes, I have found the following useful:
1. Identify Internal Rotation deficits and work on them.
2. Identify other deficits (extension, for example) and work on them.
3. Keep a kettlebell in one arm in the floor press top position or TGU start position, feel the weight on the shoulder touching the floor, externally rotate the shoulder. Keeping this for 2-4 mins at a time.
4. Banded shoulder rotations
5. Lacrosse ball work on the traps, T-spine, etc.
6. If someone like a chiro can look at a tight neck, it would help get your shoulder in better position.
Basically it seems you need to get the head of the humerus into the back part of the joint for effective position in OH moves like the snatch or press. This would spare your labral tears and repairs.
I have learned quite a bit of this from Kelly Starrett of MWod. I am sure there are many other good resources as well.

Interesting DLS. Mine still had a moderate displacement years later, I think it was maybe 15 years to pretty much vanish. But gone it is. Smart doc there. Too many are in love w/ the scalpel. Maybe more the surgeons..."When the only tool you have is a hammer..."
 

GeoffreyLevens

New member
There is a defined treatment or set of options for each injury.
I was referencing an experience quite a few years ago and likely standard options have changed since then but in my experience, many doctors will go for the more aggressive end of the option spectrum when the often the least would be best.
 

Future

New member
Interesting stuff Rambodoc, thanks for that. Do you have any suggestions as to how I can progress on my TGU? Should I go for longer duration with the 24kg or heavier, lower rep?
 

Rambodoc

New member
Future: I am certainly no expert, but (left to my own ministrations), I would not beat the TGU so much. I would try the other things I mentioned. If you are using the TGU for rehab, going heavy for low reps (maybe half get ups?) may be fine, but it would be dicey if your form is off. So I would repeat the thought (let's not call it advice) that I would try to fix the specific defects in movement by mobilizing the joint such that I can be in a better position for OH movement. Does this make sense?

Interesting stuff Rambodoc, thanks for that. Do you have any suggestions as to how I can progress on my TGU? Should I go for longer duration with the 24kg or heavier, lower rep?
 
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