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Thoughts on "Overtraining"

JesseHolmz

New member
i'm new to the whole kettlebell world but not to weight training. i've been lfiting more of a bodybuilding style for the past couple years and have made really good progress with strength, etc.

the only thing i always had issues with is training intensity. i always heard a ridiculous amount about "overtraining" but i don't think i've ever experienced it. i was hoping someone here could give me some insight into what it actually is and the amount of activity that would actually constitute overtraining.

right now i'm doing a 5x5 program 3x a week, doing the regular "big 3" lifts with the addition of dips, military press and weighted pullup/chinups. on the 2 other days, i'm doing light kettlebell stuff.. right now just practicing form with cleans and swings, etc.

thanks for the input
 

stuckey

New member
Over-training is different for everyone based on there conditioning and there ability to recover from there effort. You will know when you find it, the fatigue is unmistakable and recovery is nonexistent. My advice is add new things slowly and keep your diet clean and spot on and you will be fine.
 

JesseHolmz

New member
so you're saying that the only sign is fatigue then? like intense lethargy where i can't stay awake or workout or what? also, how do you know how good your recovery is? is tehre any physical attributes?
 

Ideal Paradigm

New member
There are several things, but not limited to, that show over training:

1. Lethargic.
2. No motivation.
3. A consistent inability to lift the same volume, intensity, or frequency as before.
4. Your heart rate increases drastically when you compare laying down, sitting up, and standing (best tested right after you wake up, if your resting heart rate differs by around 10-20, you may be overtrained).
5. Excessive muscle soreness (longer than usual).
 

xafier

New member
Personally I've been ensuring I have a back-off week at least every couple of months, although I've mostly been doing 3 weeks hard, 1 week easy... sometimes I think to myself "why don't I just go all out for as long as possible??"

But that's when I say to myself "because this is working! you can't complain with results! and you don't want an injury!"
 

mc

New member
so you're saying that the only sign is fatigue then? like intense lethargy where i can't stay awake or workout or what? also, how do you know how good your recovery is? is tehre any physical attributes?

just to add to ideal's and xafier's keen observations and recommendations,

if you search the forum for overtraining, you'll find it's been discussed a lot. There are lots of signs once you have it, but the research is totally out on what the signs are coming up to it. Best solution: don't put yourself in a position to get near to that kind of fatigue.

Good question you ask: how do you know about your recovery?

Until you've been working out for awhile you don't know yourself well enough to know what's too much.

This is why if you follow a program like enter the kettlebell (recommended strongly - review) you don't have to worry about it. The protocols are developed to get you up to speed ready to do kettlebell work progressively, and back off periods are built in. So are recovery periods.

if you do not follow ETK - while getting into this, plan on just backing off to little or nothing every four to six weeks - no matter how you feel about your workouts. Better safe than sorry. Really, overtraining can finally hit like a hammer and then it's really hard to come back in a timely way. Here's the first part of a three part article on overtraining just by way of info.

mc
 

ad5ly

New member
mc is correct. A preventative program in avoiding overtraining.. is far better (and smarter) than corrective action taken (re-hab, physical therapy, lost training time)...when the damage has been done. ..Dennis
 

JesseHolmz

New member
just to add to ideal's and xafier's keen observations and recommendations,

if you search the forum for overtraining, you'll find it's been discussed a lot. There are lots of signs once you have it, but the research is totally out on what the signs are coming up to it. Best solution: don't put yourself in a position to get near to that kind of fatigue.

Good question you ask: how do you know about your recovery?

Until you've been working out for awhile you don't know yourself well enough to know what's too much.

This is why if you follow a program like enter the kettlebell (recommended strongly - review) you don't have to worry about it. The protocols are developed to get you up to speed ready to do kettlebell work progressively, and back off periods are built in. So are recovery periods.

if you do not follow ETK - while getting into this, plan on just backing off to little or nothing every four to six weeks - no matter how you feel about your workouts. Better safe than sorry. Really, overtraining can finally hit like a hammer and then it's really hard to come back in a timely way. Here's the first part of a three part article on overtraining just by way of info.

mc
based on what everyone is saying, it seems like overtraining refers to stress built up over weeks, is that right? i always thought it was stress built up during 1 week, where you recover during 2 days or whatever your routine has. i was more concerned with doing too much within that 1 week.. i know about taking a week off every so often, i was just more confused about the volume you're supposed to do in your actual training weeks before you end up overtraining.
 

xafier

New member
Well it is wise to have at least 1 days rest per week, maybe 2. This is especially true if you have an active career such as a labourer or something.

The important thing to remember is that if you feel tired, then don't push through it, your body is telling you it can't handle it, so listen. Its better to rest than to push through and pull a muscle, or worse!

It's sometimes difficult to do, especially when you are very close to a new personal best! Yesterday I was pushing to try and see if I could increase my clean and press maximum to more than 1 rep with my 25kg... I did 1 rep, I did two reps, I knew I didn't have it in me for a third but wanted it so badly... nearly tweaked my shoulder... re-learnt my own lesson of don't put goals before rest!
 
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