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Why no TGU's?

HUNTER1313

New member
I routinely follow RKC blogs and have noticed that alot don't seem to be doing TGU's. Is it just a matter of preferance, training goal, or is the press just the better choice (after you have mastered the TGU of course)?
 

Stevie D

New member
I don't understand why people don't do it. A major benefit of TGU's is core strength. It also adds to shoulder health, but remember that Pavel's programs usually use presses for developing the shoulders. Once you have built the shoulders up and you are going to be swinging your upper body around doing your sport, you are going to need a core that is strong in all directions, flexible, lithe and supportive. That is where the TGU comes in.
 
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ad5ly

New member
I believe that many are doing TGUs - not all the time but maybe in rotation with other drills. Of course others have preferences that do not include the TGU. I suspect that most RKCs return to the TGU if for only to retain that skill. As far as mastery of the TGU - the complexiity of the move throughout would require a long time to be a master in it - if that is even possible. It is probably the most technical of any other kb drill and to just "master" it then leave it by the wayside to do other stuff would just be a waste time - so then why bother with it at all? I have found that no matter how good I think I get at doing them - I still have those "aha" moments when I see there is still room to improve. So for me "mastery" is unattainable so I just enjoy the ride..Dennis
 

danfaz

New member
but remember that Pavel's programs usually use presses for developing the shoulders. Once you have built the shoulders up...you are going to need a core that is strong in all directions, flexible, lithe and supportive...

I understand what you're saying here, but a healthy dose of single KB presses, ala ETK, will thoroughly train your midsection. Notice there is no abdominal exercise in ETK: they get worked at the same time you are pressing.
 

Stevie D

New member
I understand what you're saying here, but a healthy dose of single KB presses, ala ETK, will thoroughly train your midsection. Notice there is no abdominal exercise in ETK: they get worked at the same time you are pressing.

Good point. In ETK, only the Program Minimum includes mandatory TGU's. The ROP seems to only have it as an option on one of the days of the week and includes lots of presses.
 

SPH-NW

New member
I find that for me at least that the press and the TGU are cyclical, I prep with the TGU to get up to that weight for pressing and then I press that weight to work up to the next weight for TGU, rinse and repeat. At least thats my pattern that I have fallen into and it seems to work wonders.

Sam
 

CaptAmerica57

New member
I have been working with KBs for a while now and this is honestly the only excercise that I do not do routinly or honestly even hardly at all, I really need to start adding TGU to my routine. thanks for reminding me of the importance of it.
 

booksbikesbeer

New member
I am no RKC, but I do keep a log of my workouts. If someone were to read that log they would think I do get ups once every couple of months.

But the truth is, I only note them when I do a true get up focused workout. The rest of the time they are included in "warm ups," which also includes single leg deadlifts, goblet squats, and a variety of mobility drills. That means I do them 3 to 5 times a week.
 

DTris

New member
I haven't done any in awhile but I am focusing on conditioning. So lots of sprints, swings, snatches, jump rope and interval running for me. I plan on adding them back in when I get my weight down more.

Also not an RKC, but TGUs are one of my favorite KB exercises.
 

kelbro

New member
I do them three times a week. 10 per side in the one workout, 11 per side the second workout and 12 per side on the third workout. 24K bell. Core feels great.
 

CharlieJay

New member
When I did ETK, I didn't even want to move onto the presses from the TGUs. I thought the TGU mad my upper body stronger than anything I had done before!
 

UncleMike

New member
3 days per week

I do 5 single TGUs per side 3 mornings every week, one bell heavier than what I'm pressing.

Makes my shoulders feel like I plugged them into a battery charger.

I've found that around 2 - 3 months after I move to a bell that's 8 kg heavier than what I'm pressing, I'll move to pressing the next heavier kettlebell.

I've loved the TGU since the first one I did.

For some reason it instantly took me back to practicing 'escapes' in high school wrestling....

A long long time ago.
 

postandspread

New member
Though I've been doing TGUs fairly regularly and in tolerably decent form, their benefits have never been very conspicuous to me. Perhaps the effects are more subtle for some people. Or maybe that complete "seamlessness" which Pavel emphasised, is crucial? Anyhow, everyone seems to rave about them so I continue to do them.
 

Chris Hansen

New member
I suppose it depends on the individual. Some people might be in a position where TGUs address an area that needs addressing and others might not.
 

jetronin

New member
I TGU and swing virtually every day (totally random loading btw) . Both are extremely important skills that need constant maintenance if one is to ever truly master them.
Remember, if it's important, do it every day.....(not my quote, someone much smarter than me said this).

My 2pence worth.
 

krabapplekid

New member
TGU are my favorite as well. Just remember no other kettlebell ex commonly discussed on the forum can lead to hypertrophy of the pec major. Heavy getups twice a week builds muscle, that is what I like.
 

Boris Bachmann

New member
I don't know how others feel about TGUs, but here's my thoughts:

TGUs aren't a glamorous exercise. They're a lot like work actually... FOR ME, it's not a "test your limits" exercise - it's a finesse/technical mastery lift. Not saying that others don't do that, just that I don't.

I make sure I include them in the mix (about once a week) because I know they are good for me and I feel better when I do them, but the honest truth is they aren't as "fun" for me personally as (for example) squats and presses are.
 
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